Town Of Hartwick
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Introduction

The Town of Hartwick, is located in Otsego County, New York. The town was incorporated in 1802 and consists of approximately 40 square miles of rolling hills and river valleys.  The Susquehanna River forms the eastern boundary of the Town.  Approximately 2,203 people live within the town.  Town Hall is located at 103 Town Drive, in the hamlet of Hartwick.

 


 

       Country Lane  Town Hall  Farm  

 


 

We welcome you to our website and hope that you will find useful information about our Town. We invite you to contact the Town Hall at 607-293-8134 for any additional information or services that you may require. Within this site, we hope you will find everything you wanted to know about Hartwick such as the people who keep the town running, and those who provide emergency services. Each of the links at left will take you to a page devoted to that particular Town function.  We are also in the process of constructing additional pages so please contact us if you do not find what you're looking for.

Department Pages:


Officials:
Town Supervisor - Robert J. O'Brien
Town Board - Janice Gage
Town Board - Quinton Hasak
Town Board - Chris Briggs
Town Board - Bruce Markusen
Town Clerk/ Tax Collector - Andrea Claudy Vazquez
Planning Board - Greg Horth, Co-Chairman
Highway Superintendent - Fred Koffer

News:
July 2018 Town Clerk Office Hours
July 12, 2018

Monday - Friday: 8:15a-10a

Monday: 3p-6p

Tuesday & Thursday: 5p-8p

Weekend Hours: Saturday 7/28, 4p-6p

CLOSED ALL DAY Wednesday, 7/25 

Planning Board Clerk Hours: July 2018
July 12, 2018
Mondays 4:30p-7:30p
2017 Annual Water Quality Report (AWQR) NOW AVAILABLE!
June 21, 2018

Annual Drinking Water Quality Report for 2017

Hartwick Water District

103 Town Drive, Hartwick, New York 13348

(Public Water Supply ID#NY3800150)

 

INTRODUCTION

 

To comply with State regulations, the Hartwick Water Commissioners are required to issue a report describing the quality of your drinking water.  The purpose of this report is to raise your understanding of our drinking water and awareness of the need to protect our drinking water sources.  In 2017, your tap water met all State drinking water health standards.  We are proud to report that our system did not violate a maximum contaminant level or any other water quality standard, as shown on Table 1 of this report. This report provides an overview of last years water quality.  Included are details about where your water comes from, what it contains, and how it compares to State standards.

 

If you have any questions about this report or concerning your drinking water, please contact Robert J. OBrien, Town Supervisor and Town of Hartwick Water Commissioner, at 607.293.8134. We want you to be informed about your drinking water.

 

 If you want to learn more, please attend any of our regularly scheduled town board meetings as posted on town calendar at www.townofhartwick.org, website or call the Hartwick Town clerk at 607.293.8123.  The meetings are held at Hartwick Town Hall, located at 103 Town Drive at 7:00 p.m.

 

WHERE DOES OUR WATER COME FROM?

 

Our water district serves approximately 416 residents, through approximately 280 metered water connections.  In general, the sources of drinking water (both tap and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells.  As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activities.  Contaminants that may be present in source water include: microbial contaminants; inorganic contaminants; pesticides and herbicides; organic chemical contaminants; and radioactive contaminants.  In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the State and the EPA prescribe regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems.  The State Health Departments DOH and the Federal Drug Administration (FDA)s regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.

 

The State permitted, primary source type for the Hartwick Water District is ground water, and is delivered through a primary well, a reserve source well, and another potential source well, currently under development and testing to be permitted by NYSDEC.

 

The Town of Hartwick owns the land around each of these wells and the reservoir and is charged with restricting activities that would contaminate them. These sources are described as follows:

 

1.             PRIMARY WELL/CREAMERY WELL

 

The primary source of ground water supply, known as the Creamery Well, was drilled in 1970 shortly after the Town acquired the privately owned Hartwick Water Companys distribution system.  The well was drilled to a depth of 43.5 feet and, at last testing, pumped at 82 gallons per minute.  This well is currently on line and is providing all of the water being used by the Water District customers.  This well is located across the road from the Town Hall, and we are pleased that the water quality has met all current NYSDOH standards.

 

2.     RESERVE WELL/FIRE HOUSE WELL

 

The reserve source of water supply, known as the Fire House Well, was drilled in 1982 to supplement the Creamery Well, if necessary.  This well is located behind Fire Station No. 1, was drilled to a depth of 137 feet and tested at 90 gallons per minute.  Do to some water quality issues; this well is currently off line used only in an emergency situation when, and if, Creamery Well is off line.

 

3.       POTENTIAL SOURCE WELL/ BEDROCK WELL (not yet connected to system).

 

The potential source of water supply, known as the Bedrock Well, was drilled in 2004 to replace the Fire House Well.(Permitting for this well is still incomplete and is pending approval from NYSDEC) This well is located on Town owned property north of the primary water source, known as the Creamery Well.

 

 

ARE THERE CONTAMINANTS IN OUR DRINKING WATER?

 

As the State regulations require, we routinely test your drinking water for numerous contaminants. These contaminants include: total coliform, turbidity, inorganic compounds, nitrate, nitrite, lead and copper, volatile organic compounds, total trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, radiological and synthetic organic compounds. The table presented below depicts which compounds were detected in your drinking water.  The State allows us to test for some contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently.  Some of our data, though representative, are more than one year old.

 

It should be noted that all drinking water, including bottled drinking water, may be reasonably expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.  More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791) or the NYSDOH, at the Oneonta, NY District office at 607-432-3911.

 

As you can see in Table 1 below, our system had no violations. We have learned through our testing that some contaminants have been detected; however, these contaminants were detected below current federal drinking water requirements.  Although arsenic was detected at the MCL for the Fire House Well this source was not used to provide drinking water to our customers as it is only used in emergencies. Table 2 denotes location where water sample was taken for testing.

 

Table 1 of Detected Contaminants

Contaminant

Violation

Date of Sample

Level Detected

Unit

MCLG

Regulatory Limit (MCL, TT or AL)

Likely Source of Contamination

Yes/No

(Avg/Max)

Measurement

(Range)

 

Nitrate

No

9/19/2017

1.39

mg/l

10

10

Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.

Barium

No

12/7/2016

0.0086

mg/l

2

2

Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits

Lead

No

7/18/2016

0.001*

mg/l

0

0.015

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits.

Copper

No

7/18/2016

1.19*

mg/l

1.3

1.3

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits.

Arsenic

No

9/19/2017

0.01

mg/l

n/a

0.01

Erosion of natural deposits; Runoff from orchards; Runoff from glass and electronics production wastes.

Nitrate

No

9/19/2017

0.023

mg/l

10

10

Erosion of natural deposits; Runoff from orchards; Runoff from glass and electronics production wastes.

Total THM

No

9/19/2017

9.5

ug/l

80

80

By-product of drinking water chlorination needed to kill harmful organisms.  TTHMs are formed when source water contains large amounts of organic matter.

Total HAA

No

9/19/2017

3.2

ug/l

60

60

By-product of drinking water disinfection needed to kill harmful organisms.

 

Table 2: Sample Source

 

 

 

CONTAMINANT

SAMPLE DATE

SAMPLE LOCATION

RESULT (mg/l)

NITRATE

9/19/2017

CREAMERY WELL

1.39

NITRATE

9/19/2017

FIRE HOUSE WELL

0.023

TOTAL THM

9/19/2017

DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

0.0095

TOTAL HAA

9/19/2017

DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

0.0032

ARSENIC

9/19/2017

FIRE HOUSE WELL

0.01

Definitions:

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

Treatment Technique (TT): A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

Milligrams per liter (mg/l): Corresponds to one part of liquid in one million parts of liquid (parts per million ppm)

 

*The level presented represents the 90th percentile of the 5 sites tested. A percentile is a value on a scale of 100 that indicates the percent of a distribution that is equal to or below it.  The 90th percentile is equal to or greater than 90% of the lead and copper values detected at your water system.  In this case, 5 samples were collected at your water system and the 90th percentile value was the average of the highest two samples.

As you can see in Table 2, our system had no violations. We have learned through our testing that some contaminants have been detected; however, these contaminants were detected below current federal drinking water requirements.  Although arsenic was detected at the MCL for the Fire House Well this source was not used to provide drinking water to our customers as it is our emergency source.

 

WHAT DOES THIS INFORMATION MEAN?

 

As you can see by the table, our system had no violations.  We have learned through our testing that some contaminants have been detected; however, these contaminants were detected below current federal drinking water requirements.  Although arsenic was detected at the MCL, it was detected in the Fire House well which was not put into our distribution system and not served to the public.  Even though this water was not served to the public we are required to present the following information on arsenic in drinking water in case we need to use the Fire House Well in the future:

 

NYS and EPA have promulgated a drinking water arsenic standard of 10 parts per billion.  While your drinking water meets the standard for arsenic, it does contain low levels of arsenic.  The standard balances the current understanding of arsenics possible health effects against the costs of removing arsenic from drinking water.  EPA continues to research the health effect of low levels of arsenic, which is a mineral known to cause cancer in humans at high concentrations and is linked to other health effects such as skin damage and circulatory problems.

 

IS OUR WATER SYSTEM MEETING OTHER RULES THAT GOVERN OPERATIONS?

During 2016, our system was in compliance with applicable State drinking water operating, monitoring and reporting requirements.

 

DO I NEED TO TAKE SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS?

 

Although our drinking water met or exceeded state and federal regulations, some people may be more vulnerable to disease causing microorganisms or pathogens in drinking water than the general population.  Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections.  These people should seek advice from their health care provider about their drinking water.  EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium, Giardia and other microbial pathogens are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

 

INFORMATION FOR NON-ENGLISH SPEAKING RESIDENTS

Spanish

Este informe contiene informacin muy importante sobre su agua beber.  Tradzcalo hable con alguien que lo entienda bien.

French

Ce rapport contient des informations importantes sur votre eau potable.  Traduisez-le ou parlez en avec quelquun qui le comprend bien.

WHY SAVE WATER AND HOW TO AVOID WASTING IT?

Although our system has an adequate amount of water to meet present and future demands, there are a number of reasons why it is important to conserve water:

       Saving water saves energy and some of the costs associated with both of these necessities of life;

       Saving water reduces the cost of energy required to pump water and the need to construct costly new wells, pumping systems and water towers; and

       Saving water lessens the strain on the water system during a dry spell or drought, helping to avoid severe water use restrictions so that essential firefighting needs are met.

You can play a role in conserving water by becoming conscious of the amount of water your household is using, and by looking for ways to use less whenever you can.  It is not hard to conserve water.  Conservation tips include:

       Automatic dishwashers use 15 gallons for every cycle, regardless of how many dishes are loaded.  So get a run for your money and load it to capacity.

       Turn off the tap when brushing your teeth.

       Check every faucet in your home for leaks.  Just a slow drip can waste 15 to 20 gallons a day.  Fix it and you can save almost 6,000 gallons per year.

       Check your toilets for leaks by putting a few drops of food coloring in the tank, watch for a few minutes to see if the color shows up in the bowl.  It is not uncommon to lose up to 100 gallons a day from one of these otherwise invisible toilet leaks.  Fix it and you save more than 30,000 gallons a year.

 

CLOSING

 

Thank you for allowing us to continue to provide your family with quality drinking water this year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make improvements that will benefit all of our customers. The costs of these improvements may be reflected in the rate structure. Rate adjustments may be necessary in order to address these improvements.  We ask that all our customers help us protect our water sources, which are the heart of our community.  Please call our office if you have questions.


Seeking PT Assistant Director for Summer Program
June 05, 2018
The Town of Hartwick is seeking a part time ​Assistant​ ​Director ​for the Hartwick Huskies Summer Recreation Program. This is a four week position that runs  through July.
 
General Function- To assist the Director in overseeing the overall operation of the program including management, safety of children, planning and implementing innovative programming and building positive parent relationships. 
 
Assistant Director responsibilities include: Assist Director with oversight of program operation Supervision of the program staff Assist the director in designing, delivering and evaluating programs to ensure they meet and exceed the needs and interests of the campers. Other duties as needed 
 
Qualifications: Dynamic, fun and exciting personality. Ability to observe campers behavior, assess its appropiateness, enforce appropriate safety regulations and emergency procedures. Excellent oral and written communication skills. Ability to work effectively and cooperatively with a diverse group that includes staff, parents, children and the Community. Experience working with children.
 
 
Application process:
 Please submit your resume and cover letter no later than June 10​th​. You may email it to htownhall@stny.rr.com​, fax it to 607-293-7914 or mail it to:
 Town of Hartwick Attn : Summer Program P.O. Box 240 Hartwick, N.Y. 13348
10th Annual Clean Sweep a Terrific Success!!
June 03, 2018

Results of the 10th Annual Hartwick Clean Sweep Event



The weather was the best so far for spring of 2018 for the 10th Annual Clean Sweep Event.  The Town of Hartwick Conservation Advisory Committee wishes to thank all the volunteers who helped that day, Saturday, May 5, 2018. They made it the most successful event ever.  Four roll-off containers of garbage, 778 tires, two roll-off containers of scrap metal, approximately 20 air conditioners, 5 refrigerators, and other appliances were recycled. Many other reusable items were also resold.  We are fortunate that the event expenses are covered by the revenue from the event which isnt possible without the help of town council persons: Janice Gage, Bruce Markusen, Chris Briggs, Quinton Hasak, and Supervisor Robert OBrien and the following event day volunteers: Chris Briggs & son, Ray Miller, Bev Drake, Alyssa Mohin, Heather Grant, Carol Niedzailkowski, Bruce Markusen, Janice & Jerry Gage,

Milton & Audra Wood,Bill Powers, Pat Ryan, Robert OBrien, Jane Johngren, Janet & Tim Williammee. And thank you to those who do roadside clean-up every spring, we thank you too!  Look for another event in October!


Martha Clarvoe - Hartwick Conservation Advisory Committee Chair

Pat Ryan - Clean Sweep 2018 Chair